Southworld

Crazy Rich Asians

Amberly Tran, Online & Broadcast Editor

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Opened August 15, Crazy Rich Asians lives up to and exceeds high expectations as the first all Asian cast film to hit the box office in twenty-five years. Originating as a paperback trilogy, the brainchild of Kevin Kwan, the movie garnered much attention for the extravagant set design, nail-biting plot, and highly anticipated cast.

Rachel Chu, played by Fresh Off the Boat star Constance Wu, portrays an unsuspecting economics and game theory professor at NYU. Her longtime boyfriend, Nick Young, meets her for a familiar, almost routine date where he proposes a trip to his Singapore home. Such a visit hints importance, as Young plans to introduce Chu to his family. Before she even agrees, half of Asia is aware of their relationship status via Radio One Asia (the posse gossiping elites), thus unleashing a swarm of angry mainlanders bent on ending their relationship and retaliating against Chu.  

She faces her boyfriend’s mother in earning her approval of the relationship and respect. After many attempts at appeasement, she decides to pull a 360 and fight fire with fire. From a petty blood-drawn threat from eligible bachelorettes, to a private investigator delving into her single mother’s past, Chu’s love for her boyfriend never wavers.

The plot features a mix of common Asian stereotypes and character traits that lay them to rest, while remaining true to heritage and culture. Not only does the film include a cast of an underrepresented minority, but it embraces a female lead. The movie breaks the barrier on the big and small screen of the stereotypical Asian supporting role. While most films use Asian characters for comedic relief, Kwan’s adaptation showcases diversity in character traits.

Crazy Rich Asians sets a high standard for entertainment to produce not only compelling films, but inclusive and unique stories. With the anticipation of Live Action Mulan and To All The Boys That I Have Loved Before, which feature Asian leads, audiences signal that Hollywood needs to step it up.

 

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